Tips, Advice & Articles

Email me when new posts are made to this blog

The Difference: Wet Wood and Green Wood

Written by Tom Filmer on April 12th, 2017.      0 comments

 

The Difference Between Green Wood and Wet Wood.

Green Wood

When firewood is first cut it can have over 50% moisture content, this moisture is stored in the cells and molecular structure of the wood. Green or unseasoned wood will take a lot of energy to burn and will produce an inefficient fire that will keep going out. Not really what you need on a cold winter night.

Depending on the species, this green wood can take from 6 months to two years to dry. The harder the wood the longer it takes to dry and it will need to have less than 25% moisture content to be considered seasoned. For this reason it is best to cut your firewood in spring or early summer, so by the time winter arrives you have some nice dry burning wood to keep you cosy and warm.

Your wood will dry/season faster outside stacked against a fence and a hardwood such as Eucalyptus can take a year or longer to be considered dry. Once seasoned it will however burn slower and produce more energy per cord than a softwood like pine. Pine is easier to split and will dry in as little as 3 months but it will take twice as much to produce the same amount of heat.

It is quite a good idea to have a mix of hardwood and soft wood. You can get your fire going with the faster burning pine or willow and use the slower burning but more expensive Eucalyptus for an overnight burn.

Wet Wood

Sometimes your seasoned wood can get wet when it is not covered from the rain, or perhaps you live in an area where you get snow. As long as it is not green it should only take a couple of days, or even hours to dry out as the moisture content is only on the surface of the wood and not in the core. Even if you put this rain wet wood straight in the fire, it should burn relatively easily without causing the dangerous creosote build up that a green or unseasoned wood will.

You may have some wet wood that is not green but if you have some green wood – it is definitely wet.

 

 

 

 

firewood

 

Pictured: Green wood and Dry wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                  Green wood and Dry wood

The difference between green wood and wet wood.

Green wood

When firewood is first cut it can have over 50% moisture content, this moisture is stored in the cells and molecular structure of the wood. Green or unseasoned wood will take a lot of energy to burn and will produce an inefficient fire that will keep going out. Not really what you need on a cold winter night.

Depending on the species, this green wood can take from 6 months to two years to dry. The harder the wood the longer it takes to dry and it will need to have less than 25% moisture content to be considered seasoned. For this reason it is best to cut your firewood in spring or early summer, so by the time winter arrives you have some nice dry burning wood to keep you cosy and warm.

Your wood will dry/season faster outside stacked against a fence and a hardwood such as Eucalyptus can take a year or longer to be considered dry. Once seasoned it will however burn slower and produce more energy per cord than a softwood like pine. Pine is easier to split and will dry in as little as 3 months but it will take twice as much to produce the same amount of heat.

It is quite a good idea to have a mix of hardwood and soft wood. You can get your fire going with the faster burning pine or willow and use the slower burning but more expensive Eucalyptus for an overnight burn.

Wet wood

Sometimes your seasoned wood can get wet when it is not covered from the rain, or perhaps you live in an area where you get snow. As long as it is not green it should only take a couple of days, or even hours to dry out as the moisture content is only on the surface of the wood and not in the core. Even if you put this rain wet wood straight in the fire, it should burn relatively easily without causing the dangerous creosote build up that a green or unseasoned wood will.

You may have some wet wood that is not green but if you have some green wood – it is definitely wet.

 

Topics: Heating
 

Comments

About Us

At Wholesale Landscapes, we supply a wide range of landscaping products that are lovingly aged and blended to ensure the absolute highest quality. We deliver commercial quantities to resellers and projects across NZ. We have a new lifestyle yard in Stoke, Nelson where home owners can access products for a superior landscaped look or a bountiful garden harvest.
 

Read more
   

Contact Us

map pin 55 Saxton Road
Stoke
Nelson
New Zealand

OPEN: Monday-Friday 7am - 5pm 
Closed: Weekends, Public Holidays